USA: National Drug Use & Health Survey – WEED USE WORSE in decades!

Dear friend,
In case you missed it, new data is out from the  National Survey on Drug Use and Health and it paints a bleak picture for the future of our country should the marijuana industry become successful in its attempt to be the next Big Tobacco.
In short, there are now twice as many daily or near daily marijuana users in the country than just a decade ago. Additionally, there are now over 8,000 new marijuana users each day and 22% of 18 to 25-year-olds are currently using the drug – the highest number for all three stats in recent memory. Worse, annual use by ages 16 and up has significantly risen since last year.
Marijuana use has skyrocketed in our country as the perception of harm has plummeted. The marijuana industry, just like Big Tobacco years ago, continues to glorify marijuana as a cure-all substance that offers no risk to anyone.
The reality is this: if it were not for marijuana, overall drug use in the country would be going down. Mental health issues are  rising, more people are  dying due to marijuana-impaired drivers, and positivity rates among our  workforce are up. None of this will help our country succeed and be productive.
But this fight is far from over, friend. Contrary to the lies of the industry, marijuana legalization is not inevitable. This year alone, SAM and our affiliates have been successful in defeating marijuana legalization and commercialization efforts in five different state capitols: Rhode Island, Illinois, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Connecticut.
In New Jersey, Governor Phil Murphy’s promise to legalize marijuana within his first hundred days in office has stalled as our allies in the Legislature have dug in their heels against this reckless proposal. The Senate is considering putting the bill to a vote in the coming weeks, but many are predicting that the votes simply aren’t there.
In response to increasing pressure in New York, we have opened an office in Manhattan and are actively organizing the resistance to let the lawmakers in Albany know that legalization would be a disaster for the Empire State.  In addition, we are continuing to form a grand coalition in the Midwest from our new hub in Chicago, Illinois.
Outside of state legislatures, we are working hard in Michigan and North Dakota to defeat marijuana legalization at the ballot box. And polls are tightening up, with onepoll showing  us ahead by a few points in Michigan.
In North Dakota, we are thrilled to be partnering with a  coalition of health professionals who are opposed to the measure, which is perhaps the most far-reaching legalization proposal I have ever seen.
If we are going to continue to win in state legislatures and win in November at the ballot box, we are going to need all the help we can get from dedicated supporters such as yourself. If you can, please consider chipping in to the effort with a donation of $500, $300, $200, $100, or even $50.
Remember, we are winning this fight and history will fondly remember those who stood up against Big Marijuana in defense of common sense.
Any amount you can give will help us push back against the marijuana industry across the country.
Thank you again for everything you do,
Dr. Kevin Sabet
Founder and President
Smart Approaches to Marijuana Action
 

About SAM Action

SAM Action is a non-profit, 501(c)(4) social welfare organization dedicated to promoting healthy marijuana policies that do not involve legalizing drugs. SAM Action engages in high-impact political campaigns to oppose marijuana legalization and commercialization.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

USA: North Dakota – Getting Smart about WEED and Pushing Back!

Group forms to fight against legalizing marijuana

By Megan Hoffman | September 2018

A new group is forming to fight against recreational marijuana becoming legal in the state. The coalition was announced Thursday, and is made up of several state groups including Greater North Dakota Chamber and law enforcement, as well as the national Smart Approaches to Marijuana, a non-profit.

Measure 3 on this fall’s ballot will give North Dakotans a chance to vote on legalizing marijuana. But Luke Niforatos with Smart Approaches to Marijuana is part of a new group aimed at making sure the initiative fails.

“You have nothing to lose by pumping the breaks right now and waiting until we learn a little bit more about marijuana legalization from the states that have legalized,” Niforatos said. “You have everything to lose if you’re wrong.”

The coalition, named, North Dakotans Against The Legalization Of Recreational Marijuana, will be out campaigning and spreading their message over the next several months. They will be working in opposition to Legalize ND, the group leading the fight for the passage of measure 3.

“Our support has always been very solid at the grassroots level and at the door to door level,” Dave Owen with Legalize ND said

For complete story http://www.kfyrtv.com/content/news/Group-forms-to-fight-against-legalizing-marijuana-492739501.html

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

USA: The President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction & the Opioid Crisis: Origins & Recommendations

By Dr Bertha K. Madras1

The United States has the ignominious distinction of leading the world in opioid prescribing,1 and in opioid-related overdose deaths. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that over 40,000 people died of an opioid-related overdose, with fentanyl-related deaths exceeding those of heroin or prescription opioids.2  Opioid overdoses are now the leading cause of unintentional deaths in the US and of declining lifespan expectancies. 3 With a worsening crisis, agencies of the US government and others produced an array of reports on the opioid crisis. Yet the death rate escalated further from 2010 to the present.

For Full Briefing COMBATING OPIOID CRISIS

The President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis – Origins and Recommendations2018

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

USA: Weed Consumption Among Teens: Worst in Recent History!

New HHS Survey:
Heavy Marijuana Use Skyrocketing;
Youth in Late Teens Using More Marijuana Now Than Any Time in Recent History
For Immediate Release:
September 14, 2018
Contact: Pat Brogan  E: Pat@learnaboutsam.org   P: 703-462-0530
(Alexandria, Va) – There are now twice as many daily or near daily marijuana users in the US than just a decade ago, according to the most comprehensive survey on drug use released today by the federal government. There are also now 8,300 new marijuana users each day, and 22% of 18 to 25 year olds are currently using the drug–the highest number for all three stats in recent memory.

“The marijuana industry is getting their wish,”  said Kevin A. Sabet, Ph.D., president of Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) and a former White House drug policy adviser. “More people are using highly potent pot edibles and other items much more often, and the perception of harm for these products is plummeting. It is time we woke up as a country and put science above ideology.”

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) also found that 42% of marijuana users use the drug daily or almost daily, and that marijuana was used by more than 8 in 10 substance users. Marijuana use rose significantly among age groups 12 and up, 18 and up, and 26 and up. Use among 12 to 17 year olds was stable versus last year, though in legalized states NSDUH data show marijuana use higher on average in legalized states.
“Big Marijuana – just like Big Tobacco years ago – continues to glorify marijuana as a cure-all that can do little or no harm,” said Sabet. “If it wasn’t for marijuana, overall drug use in this country would be going down. Rising mental health issuesdrugged driving crashes, and an increasingly stoned workforce won’t help us get ahead. We should put the brakes on marijuana legalization and start a national science-based marijuana awareness campaign similar to successful anti-tobacco campaigns.”
NSDUH state-level data, which shows the gulf between use in states with legalized pot versus those with no legalization laws, is expected later this year and not included in this report. The last state estimate report showed  Colorado is the #1 state in the country for first time marijuana use among teens.
According to a recent  report by SAM, legalized states have seen negative public health and safety consequences, including increased marijuana use and car crashes related to marijuana.
“We shouldn’t incarcerate people for marijuana use, but legalization is promoting a commercial industry driving heavy pot use among young people. We need a smarter approach that focuses on prevention, awareness, and recovery,” added Sabet.
Research has found that marijuana affects the developing brain negatively, and that most people’s brains develop well into their 20s.
SAM will be updating info about NSDUH as we receive the full report.

UM: Pot use among college students at 30-year high

Breana Noble, The Detroit News Sept. 5, 2018

Marijuana use among college-age people is at the highest level in three decades and fewer think using it is harmful, according to researchers at the University of Michigan.

Months before Michigan voters will decide whether to legalize marijuana for recreational use, the annual study found marijuana use among the nation’s 19-to-22-year-olds has increased gradually over the past decade as marijuana becomes more easily accessible and young people view the drug as less risky.

Researchers also found that youths who do not attend college are more likely to use marijuana. The study also surveyed other drug use among the age group and found non-medical use of prescription narcotic drugs was at its lowest since the late 1990s.

The federal National Institute on Drug Abuse paid for the survey, Monitoring the Future Panel Study.

“In this country, laws are changing, attitudes are changing, people are not perceiving use, even regular use, as dangerous as they used to,” said John Schulenberg, the study’s principal investigator and a psychology professor at the university.

“And this could be the problem. On this daily use, the scientific evidence is pretty clear that this gets in the way of things, and it can be associated with, if not contributing to, a decline in mental health.

“If one is involved in heavy use, and they continue with that,” Schulenberg said, “then their health and wellness and happiness is probably not as high as those who do not use or do not continue to use.”

For complete story https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/2018/09/05/monitoring-future-panel-study-university-michigan-marijuana-college-students-2017/1190950002/

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

USA: WEED not a prublom?

Slides based on 2017 NSDUH Annual National Report – Trends Only

https://www.samhsa.gov/data/report/2017-nsduh-detailed-tables

Table 8.9B – Types of Illicit Drug Use in Past Year among Persons Aged 18 or Older, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness: Percentages, 2016 and 2017
Drug Total
(2016)
Total
(2017)
Any
Mental
Illness
(2016)
Any
Mental
Illness
(2017)
Serious
Mental
Illness
(2016)
Serious
Mental
Illness
(2017)
Any Mental
Illness
Excluding
Serious
Mental Illness
(2016)
Any Mental
Illness
Excluding
Serious
Mental Illness
(2017)
No
Mental
Illness
(2016)
No
Mental
Illness
(2017)
ILLICIT DRUGS1 18.2b 19.3 32.4a 34.3 43.3 44.1 29.0a 31.1 15.1a 15.8
Marijuana 14.1b 15.3 24.0b 26.2 30.6 32.8 22.0a 24.2 12.0b 12.8
Cocaine 2.0b 2.4 4.0a 4.7 5.7b 8.2 3.5 3.6 1.6a 1.8
Crack 0.4 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.7 2.3 0.7 0.7 0.2 0.2
Heroin 0.4 0.4 1.1 1.1 2.1 2.4 0.8 0.7 0.2 0.2
Hallucinogens 1.8 1.9 3.8 4.3 4.9a 6.6 3.5 3.5 1.4 1.3
LSD 0.7 0.8 1.5a 1.9 2.1b 3.5 1.3 1.4 0.5 0.5
PCP 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0
Ecstasy 0.9 0.9 1.9 2.1 2.2b 3.6 1.8 1.6 0.7 0.7
Inhalants 0.5 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.4 1.9 0.8 1.0 0.3 0.3
Methamphetamine 0.6 0.6 1.8 1.9 3.1 3.4 1.3 1.4 0.3 0.4
Misuse of Psychotherapeutics2 7.1 6.8 15.9 15.2 23.5 22.4 13.5 12.9 5.1 4.9
Pain Relievers 4.3 4.2 10.1 9.7 15.5 14.3 8.5 8.2 3.1 2.9
Tranquilizers 2.3 2.2 6.2 6.0 10.2 9.9 5.0 4.8 1.4 1.3
Stimulants 2.1 2.2 4.7 4.9 7.2 7.6 3.9 4.0 1.6 1.6
Sedatives 0.6 0.5 1.6 1.6 2.5 3.1 1.3 1.1 0.4 0.3
OPIOIDS (HEROIN USE OR PAIN RELIEVER MISUSE) 4.5 4.3 10.4 10.1 16.1 15.1 8.7 8.5 3.1 3.0

 

 

Table 8.9A – Types of Illicit Drug Use in Past Year among Persons Aged 18 or Older, by Past Year Level of Mental Illness: Numbers in Thousands, 2016 and 2017
Drug Total
(2016)
Total
(2017)
Any
Mental
Illness
(2016)
Any
Mental
Illness
(2017)
Serious
Mental
Illness
(2016)
Serious
Mental
Illness
(2017)
Any Mental
Illness
Excluding
Serious
Mental Illness
(2016)
Any Mental
Illness
Excluding
Serious
Mental Illness
(2017)
No
Mental
Illness
(2016)
No
Mental
Illness
(2017)
ILLICIT DRUGS1 44,559b 47,726 14,447b 15,974 4,487 4,935 9,960a 11,039 30,112a 31,752
Marijuana 34,588b 37,841 10,702b 12,240 3,168a 3,665 7,534b 8,575 23,886a 25,600
Cocaine 4,936b 5,816 1,771a 2,175 587b 913 1,184 1,262 3,165a 3,640
Crack 871 913 425 517 177 255 248 262 447 396
Heroin 934 872 496 533 218 270 278 263 438 339
Hallucinogens 4,447 4,613 1,698 1,992 506b 744 1,192 1,248 2,748 2,621
LSD 1,692a 1,984 651b 901 213b 393 438 508 1,042 1,084
PCP 85 73 44 53 29 9 15 44 40 20
Ecstasy 2,308 2,313 849 973 224b 400 624 573 1,459 1,340
Inhalants 1,106 1,185 432 584 150 215 282 369 674 601
Methamphetamine 1,360 1,585 782 872 320 381 462 491 577 713
Misuse of Psychotherapeutics2 17,354 16,844 7,083 7,086 2,437 2,505 4,646 4,581 10,271 9,759
Pain Relievers 10,635 10,310 4,530 4,518 1,609 1,598 2,921 2,921 6,105 5,792
Tranquilizers 5,626 5,485 2,761 2,811 1,060 1,112 1,701 1,698 2,865 2,675
Stimulants 5,220 5,386 2,085 2,274 750 850 1,335 1,425 3,135 3,112
Sedatives 1,431 1,278 693 724 262 343 430 381 739 554
OPIOIDS (HEROIN USE OR PAIN RELIEVER MISUSE) 10,933 10,632 4,662 4,711 1,666 1,695 2,996 3,016 6,271 5,921

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

USA: Take a Non-Weed filled Breath and Rethink the Commercialization of Cannabis!

Dear friend,
I couldn’t wait for the weekend to be over to share this op-ed with you from the US Attorney in Colorado. It took real courage to do what he did, and we can hope it’s a sign of things to come.
Thank you again for everything you do,
Dr. Kevin Sabet
Founder and President
Smart Approaches to Marijuana
It’s high time we took a breath from marijuana commercialization
By  BOB TROYER | Guest Commentary
September 28, 2018 at 4:51 pm
In 2012 we were told Colorado would lead the nation on a grand experiment in commercialized marijuana. Six years later – with two major industry reports just released and the state legislature and Denver City Council about to consider more expansion measures – it’s a perfect time to pause and assess some results of that experiment.
Where has our breathless sprint into full-scale marijuana commercialization led Colorado?
Well, recent reports from the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, from Denver Health, from Energy Associates, from the Colorado Department of Revenue and from the City of Denver should be enough to give everyone in this race pause.
Now Colorado’s youth use marijuana at a rate 85 percent higher than the national average. Now marijuana-related traffic fatalities are up by 151 percent. Now 70 percent of 400 licensed pot shops surveyed recommend that pregnant women use marijuana to treat morning sickness. Now an indoor marijuana grow consumes 17 times more power per square foot than an average residence. Now each of the approximately one million adult marijuana plants grown by licensed growers in Colorado consumes over 2.2 liters of water – per day. Now Colorado has issued over 40 little-publicized recalls of retail marijuana laced with pesticides and mold.
And now Colorado has a booming black market exploiting our permissive regulatory system – including Mexican cartel growers for that black market who use nerve-agent pesticides that are contaminating Colorado’s soil, waters, and wildlife.  Marijuana commercialization has led Colorado to these places.  It also has led to Colorado’s prominence in other states considering commercialization.
As the U.S. attorney leading other U.S. attorneys on marijuana issues, I have traveled the country and heard what people are saying about Colorado. Do they tout Colorado’s tax revenue from commercialized marijuana? No, because there’s been no net gain:  marijuana tax revenue adds less than one percent to Colorado’s coffers, which is more than washed out by the public health, public safety, and regulatory costs of commercialization.
Do they highlight commercialization’s elimination of a marijuana black market? No, because Colorado’s black market has actually exploded after commercialization: we have become a source-state, a theater of operation for sophisticated international drug trafficking and money laundering organizations from Cuba, China, Mexico, and elsewhere.
Do they promote our success in controlling production or containing marijuana within our borders?  No, because last year alone the regulated industry produced 6.4 metric tons of unaccounted-for marijuana, and over 80,000 black market plants were found on Colorado’s federal lands.
Does the industry trumpet its promised decrease in alcohol use? No, because Colorado’s alcohol consumption has steadily climbed since marijuana commercialization. How about the industry’s claim that marijuana will cure opioid addiction? No, a Lancet study found that heavy marijuana users end up with more pain and are more likely to abuse opioids.
Yet on that last point, the marijuana industry is trying to exploit our nation’s opioid tragedy to push its own controlled substance as a panacea. Why? It’s a profit opportunity.
Which is also how they see our youth. Which is why in Colorado they now sell marijuana-consumption devices that avoid detection at schools, like vape pens made to look like high-lighters and eye-liner.
These are the same marketers who advertise higher and higher potency marijuana gummi candy, marijuana suppositories, and marijuana “intimate creams.” This aggressive marketing makes perfect sense in addiction industries like tobacco, alcohol, opioids, and marijuana. These industries make the vast majority of their profits from heavy users, and so they strive to create and maintain this user market. Especially when users are young and their brains are most vulnerable to addiction.
I’m not sure the 55 percent of Coloradans who voted for commercialization in 2012 thought they were voting for all this.
These impacts are why you may start seeing U.S. attorneys shift toward criminally charging licensed marijuana businesses and their investors. After all, a U.S. attorney is responsible for public safety.
My office has always looked at marijuana solely through that lens, and that approach has not changed. But the public safety impacts of marijuana in Colorado have.
Now that federal enforcement has shot down marijuana grows on federal lands, the crosshairs may appropriately shift to the public harms caused by licensed businesses and their investors, particularly those who are not complying with state law or trying to use purported state compliance as a shield.
We should pause and catch our breath before racing off again at the industry’s urging. Let’s call it “just say know.” Let’s educate ourselves about the impacts of commercialization. Let’s reclaim our right as citizens to have a say in Colorado’s health, safety, and environment. Unfettered commercialization is not inevitable. You have a say.
Bob Troyer became the U.S. attorney for the District of Colorado in 2016 after working as first assistant U.S. attorney for six years.

About SAM

Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) is a nonpartisan, non-profit alliance of physicians, policy makers, prevention workers, treatment and recovery professionals, scientists, and other concerned citizens opposed to marijuana legalization who want health and scientific evidence to guide marijuana policies. SAM has affiliates in more than 30 states. For more information about marijuana use and its effects, visit  www.learnaboutsam.org

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

UK: Pro-drug Lobby, hijack genuine care to spread the NCD of Drug Use!

Drugs treatment training? No, a love-in for legalisers

By  Neil McKeganey August 22, 2018

A conference which is widely attended by drug treatment staff in England and Wales is fast becoming an exercise in drug legalisation propaganda. The annual National Substance Misuse Conference attracts a large number of general practitioners and other health care staff to hear the latest in drug treatment policy and practice. The conference is widely promoted by a range of respected public health bodies including Substance Misuse Management in General Practice, Addaction, a leading drug treatment agency, and Collective Voice which represents many of those working in the drugs treatment field and those in contact with drug treatment services. Delegates can claim continuing professional development credit. This is a serious conference, on a serious theme, for serious people.

Ths year’s conference, to be held in Birmingham on September 13, will be opened by representatives from Release, a drugs charity which has long campaigned for the legalisation of illegal drugs within the UK. Following the welcome, delegates will hear from Professor Alex Stevens, a criminologist from the University of Kent who has similarly widely advocated drugs policy change and legalisation. Hot on the heels of Professor Stevens, representatives of the Transform organisation, the UK’s leading drugs legalisation lobby group, will take the stage. Those who miss Transform can opt instead to hear David Jamieson, West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner, who has advocated the wider prescribing of heroin to addicts in England, the setting up of drug consumption rooms and for drug use to be treated as a health rather than a criminal justice matter.

For more https://www.conservativewoman.co.uk/drugs-discussion-no-a-love-in-for-legalisers/

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Global: Injecting Rooms – Empowering, Equipping, Enabling and Endorsing HARM!

#RECOVERY MONTH

Damning study shows Seattle’s heroin injection advocates are dead wrong

BY JASON RANTZ AUGUST 28, 2018

We know heroin injection sites don’t treat heroin addiction, which is precisely why advocates never point to data suggesting they get addicts off the drug that is ruining their lives before, inevitably, killing them.

RELATED: Seattle considered mobile safe injection site

But Seattle advocates, in their quest to bring these sites to the area, love to claim their idea will save the lives of addicts by cutting down on needle sharing and diseases associated with that behavior.

Well, they’re wrong.

A damning new study published in the International Journal of Drug Policy suggests the talking points used by advocates like Seattle Councilmembers Teresa Mosqueda and Lorena Gonzalez aren’t based in reality.

It turns out, the studies that advocates used to promote heroin injection sites were deeply flawed. Per German Lopez (who once advocated for heroin injection sites) of Vox:

One of the problems the review found is that the research is seriously lacking in this area. Out of the dozens of studies on the topic they found, the researchers concluded that only eight were rigorous and transparent enough to include in the review. With such a small pool of studies included, it’s possible — maybe even likely — that these few studies were in some ways biased, so future research could produce entirely different findings.

This was the first meta-analysis review on the topic.

Data doesn’t back up talking points

Of the 40 studies on the topic, the researchers booted the weak studies, such as those with data that couldn’t be replicated. It left them with eight meaningful studies to review.

They found, based on this data, that heroin injection sites “had no significant effect on most outcomes…” like “ambulance attendances relating to opioid-related events, overdose mortality … borrowing or sharing syringes and injecting equipment, and problematic heroin use or injection.”

“The contrast between the claims that are being made and what the evidence actually says are fairly disappointing,” according to Keith Humphreys, a drug policy expert at Stanford University, to Vox. Humphreys will be on KTTH Radio’s Jason Rantz Show this Friday, Aug. 31.

That so few meaningful studies exist should come as no surprise. Advocates often look to Vancouver BC’s Insite, the heroin injection site Seattle is trying to model theirs after, claim there’s plenty of evidence to back up its effectiveness. But there isn’t. One study that made the claim is highly controversial because the people who conducted the study were the ones in charge of the program.

Local expert reacts (with great bias)

Speaking of bias, perhaps that is what’s leading to one local critic taking issue with this meta-analysis.

“That’s surprising,” Dr. Caleb Banta-Green, at the University of Washington, said of this new analysis to KIRO 7. “And then you dig into it and realize they’re doing a different type of study. And they’re looking at eight studies of four locations, even though there are more than 100 locations around the world.”

Indeed, that’s exactly what they’re doing. They’re doing it because the other studies provided subpar results to review. And this meta-analysis was solid, per Lopez:

The eight studies, though, were meant to be the best that the researchers could find. The studies that were excluded were those for which the researchers couldn’t get full data sets and which didn’t have comparison groups — fairly big methodological gaps.

This is typical in meta-analyses: The ideal is randomized controlled trials. But if none exist, researchers start looking at other kinds of studies, while maintaining some level of rigor, to tease out the evidence that is available.

And what the KIRO 7 piece inadvertently left out is that Banta-Green was part of the task force recommending that heroin injection sites be opened in King County. So this meta-analysis flies in the face of what he recommended.

And his message appears to be shifting, at least in part.

“It (safe injection sites) may not help with mortality rates,” Banta-Green admitted to KIRO 7. “I suspect it does, but it’s small.”

But in March of 2017, Banta-Green pushed this idea as saving lives to The Seattle Times: “I believe there is fundamental value in keeping people alive.”

Only, it’s not keeping people alive. And now, not only is there evidence to suggest it, Banta-Green is acknowledging it may not save lives. I’m not willing to ruin any more Seattle neighborhoods; I don’t want them becoming what the neighborhood hosting InSite has become. I’ve been there. It’s horrible.

Now, like I suspect is the case with Banta-Green, I have bias, too. I am against the heroin injection sites because I don’t think it’s ethical or moral to enable addicts to destroy their lives — even if it’s more slowly than they otherwise would be acting. I believe in treatment on-demand and free addiction services across the board.

The difference, however, is my bias is backed by actual data. This data isn’t the end-all, be-all. It simply shows the talking points Progressives are using are wrong. If you show me data suggesting heroin injection sites actually get people off of heroin, I’ll happily change my positions. The advocates, like Mosqueda and Gonzales? They have nothing but blind ideology on their side.

http://mynorthwest.com/1093100/seattle-heroin-injection-study/ (August 2018)

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

USA: Drug User Can Change Their Behaviour!

#RECOVERY MONTH

New Yorkers Who Use Drugs Report Changing Behaviors to Avoid Overdose

Study participants reported apprehension about the potency of fentanyl and the need to use drugs more cautiously in case they contain fentanyl. As a result, many people who use drugs reported using a variety of harm reduction strategies to prevent overdose, including test shots, buying drugs from a consistent source, reducing drug use, using fentanyl test strips, carrying naloxone (a medication used to reverse opioid overdoses), and using drugs in the presence of others.

The most common behavioral change reported was doing a test shot, or injecting a small amount of a drug to gauge its strength. A handful of people reported using test shots every time they injected, whereas others only used them if something about their drugs looked different or if they were warned that their heroin was new or potent.

Some participants reported using fentanyl test trips, a relatively new opioid overdose prevention approach, although the number of programs currently distributing fentanyl test strips is limited.

Some people reported using drugs in the company of others to prevent overdose, while others said they still preferred to use alone. Regardless, for most people who use drugs, their living situation often dictates where they use – for instance, whether they have stable housing, or are homeless and/or live in a shelter.

Experience with naloxone was widespread among people in the study. Over two-thirds reported carrying naloxone with them at least half of the time and several people reported being revived with it or using it on others. However, some people reported difficulty carrying naloxone due to judgment from others or homeless shelter policies that prohibit certain forms of naloxone.

“While nearly all study participants were knowledgeable about minimizing their risk for overdose and many reported using methods to reduce their risk, most were not consistent in applying these methods,” said CDUHR researcher Courtney McKnight, DrPH, clinical assistant professor at NYU College of Global Public Health and the study’s lead author. “Using methods to reduce the risk of overdose was often complicated by structural factors such as stigma, poverty, and homelessness, which were further complicated by dependence and the increased prevalence of fentanyl.”

For complete story https://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publications/news/2018/september/new-yorkers-who-use-drugs-report-changing-behaviors-to-avoid-ove.html

If the substance user/dependent/addict has ‘all the gear’ available to inject substances for free, and clearly the self-awareness to ‘change behaviour’ revealed in the study undertaken; and can clearly self-manage their self-mediating (and/or self-harming and/or recalcitrant hedonism activities) then a Supervised Injecting Room is not only redundant, but a costly means of intruding on a clearly unconcerned with recovery drug user?

So, why would anyone use an injecting room? Perhaps only really to try out very much ‘unknown’ drug cocktail, so they can then better sustain their ongoing drug use… oh, and all at tax-payers expense, of course. In appears ‘saving lives’ can be done a lot cheaper, if saving lives was the agenda behind the ever-growing raft of Harm Reduction ‘options’ for law-breaking and self-harming drug use!

Ah, but the evidence is overwhelming now, that it really isn’t (sadly) about the saving and recovering of lives, but rather the normalisation and State endorsement of ongoing drug use.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Canada: Pot Promoting Policy Pace Proving Problematic!

#RECOVERY MONTH

‘Deeply concerned’: Marijuana legalization moving too fast for most Canadians, poll suggests

Six out of 10 Canadians think the Cannabis Act ‘is just a big political move to get votes and nothing else,’ and want legalization delayed for up to one year Iva Poshnjari June 28, 2018

The majority of Canadians want marijuana legalization delayed for up to one year to give federal and provincial governments more time to figure out how to deal with the societal implications, according to a new poll.

After the Cannabis Act passed its final vote in parliament last week, Justin Trudeau announced that marijuana will become legal on Oct. 17, giving provinces and territories just under four months to get ready. But 55 per cent of Canadians want legalization delayed, and 69 per cent are worried that the black market will continue to thrive because legal cannabis will cost more, according to a new Dart Insight poll conducted earlier this month.

In fact, six out of 10 Canadians think the Cannabis Act “is just a big political move to get votes and nothing else.” This sentiment is most common in Alberta (68 per cent) and Quebec (64 per cent), while 51 per cent of people in B.C. disagree. This view is also more likely to be held by men (62 per cent) than women (55 per cent), but even 58 per cent of young Canadians, aged 18-34, agree that the Liberals legalized marijuana for political gain.

“We’ve got a majority of people in this country, about half the population, that is deeply concerned that marijuana is going to roll out and key sections of society are not prepared to deal with it,” said John Wright, CEO of Dart Insight. “The motive is purely political, but the impact at the local level is very real…. If it comes off the rails, the Liberals may pay a price for it in the next election.”

For complete story https://nationalpost.com/cannabis/deeply-concerned-marijuana-legalization-moving-too-fast-for-most-canadians-poll-suggests

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment